Philosophers on work

Why do we work? Do we work for money, for success, to define ourselves in the world, or for some other reason?

First of all discuss the following statements with a friend and see if you agree.

  • If you don’t work then you are not truly human.
  • Work keeps us away from more important activities.
  • Work is a means to fulfill personal ambitions.
  • Work conflicts with our human inclination to relax and have a good time.

Now read what the philospophers have to say and tell us in the comments which one(s) you agree (or disagree) with!

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No need for ‘necessity’

It is a necessity of Christian churches to address post-colonial issues in their ministerial aspects.

This was a special request from subscriber and special friend Elia who is unsure about his use of the word ‘necessity’. Like many Indonesians he is not confident when it comes to expressing subtle degrees of obligation, the Indonesian equivalents for which are often less subtle than their English counterparts. Continue reading

Both or both of?

Euthanasia may be a good solution for both of patients and their families.

Both/both of follows the same rule as some/some of, all/all of, most/most of, etc. Elsewhere on GuruEAP you can listen to a song that includes examples of most of these (but not, I now realise, both/both of!), plus you can find another post showing how this kind of grammar can be useful in IELTS task 1 writing when describing statistical data.

As usual I suggest you approach this problem lexically – in other words pay close attention to the words (lexis) immediately following these signals. Here are some examples. Continue reading