Searching for missing nouns

Living far away from home improves their ability in money managing, since their parents may not support their financial.

First of all, congratulations to this student for use of the word ‘since’. Perhaps she read my previous post dealing with because, since and as?

Unfortunately the use of ‘financial’ here lacks coherence because the Indonesian version of ‘financial’ – finansial – is used informally as a noun, whereas in English it is always an adjective. The reader is left wondering.. financial what?

The following alternatives use different word forms and also include strong collocation:

  • ..their parents may not cover their financial commitments. (adjective affects and collocates with commitments)
  • ..their parents may not support them financially(adverb affects and collocates with support)
  • ..their parents may not cover their finances(noun collocates with cover)

The only other example I can think of in which an imported adjective is used as a noun, might be:

  • Taking drugs is not good for your mental.

..which should read:

  • Taking drugs is not good for your mental health.

If you can think of any other words that get lost in translation in the same way, please comment below this post!

A refreshing refreshment

Students can take a break while they are studying in college for refreshing.

flag-of-indonesia This word has been borrowed from English and used in Indonesian as a noun. However, in English ‘refreshing‘ is not a noun, and the closest noun available is ‘refreshment‘, but this is used almost exclusively for food and drink.

Refreshing‘ is an adjective:

  • Students can take a refreshing break while they are studying at college.
  • Taking a break while studying at college can be refreshing.

Refreshed and refreshing

IELTS candidates are often asked to explain why they enjoy certain activities, for example going to the beach at the weekend. In this case both the adjectives ‘refreshing’ and ‘refreshed’ might be used:

  • Going to the beach at the weekend is refreshing.
  • When I go to the beach at the weekend I feel refreshed.

Refreshing and refreshed follow the same rule as bored and boring, where the __ing form is for the source, and the __ed form is used for the receiver:

  • I feel refreshed. (receiver: I)
  • Going to the beach is refreshing. (source: Going to the beach)

Refresh

Finally, you might use the verb ‘refresh‘:

  • I go to the beach at the weekend to refresh myself.

Notice that in this case you must include an object: refresh myself. Also notice that when you’re explaining why you do something, you use to + V1 (not for).

Further study

Check out these other examples of ‘refreshing’.

Can’t get no results satisfaction

If I am given more time in the reading test, I will answer all of the questions with satisfied results.

This is like the bored/boring distinction, right? Let’s say Bill is talking to Mary about space travel, but Mary is not interested in space travel. In this case Mary feels bored (the effect), but Bill is boring (the cause). (flag-of-indonesia In Indonesian there is an easy translation, where the suffix ‘kan’ behaves a bit like ‘ing’: boring > membosankan).

If we return to the original problem..

  • If I am given more time in the reading test, I will answer all of the questions with satisfying results.

‘Satisfying’ is the cause. The effect – satisfied – is something that you might feel when your results are satisfying.

You can also use a related word with a slightly different meaning:

  • If I am given more time in the reading test, I will answer all of the questions with satisfactory results.

@guruEAP