Let’s discuss ‘discuss about’

A variety of arguments have been put forward to discuss about the difference between a linear economy and a circular economy.

Let’s see what netspeak.org has to say about discuss and talk:

talk about

discuss

As you can see, talk is often followed by about, but discuss is never followed by about!

  • Today I’m going to discuss about unemployment.
  • Today I’m going to talk about unemployment.
  • Today I’m going to discuss unemployment.

Hope that helps!

A problem has arisen

The involvement of government in indigenous governance has arisen a variety of arguments.

Here there is a vocabulary problem AND a grammar problem!

First the grammar problem..

In other languages (Indonesian flag ‘memunculkan’) the verb ‘arise’ can be transitive (can take an object), but in English it cannot. However, there do exist alternatives that allow you to keep the object (obj – ‘a variety of arguments’): Continue reading

Reconstructing Chomsky on Language

Recently in class Chomsky’s name came up in discussion as the most widely cited author, but not many students knew his name or why he is so well-known.

The following video outlines Chomsky’s ground-breaking theory of language.

Before you watch the video, discuss with a friend the following questions.

  • What makes human language different from animal language?
  • Is language learned, or are we born with it?
  • How is it possible that small children learn languages so quickly?

Watch the video and then attempt the text reconstruction activity at the bottom of the page.

Continue reading

Market(s) and ‘the market’

It is important to test products on animals before releasing them commercially to markets.

The problem here is that there are two kinds of market – physical and virtual – and in this example, markets (plural) suggests more than one physical market, while releasing them commercially suggests more than one virtual market. Let’s take a look at some examples. Continue reading

Complete with ‘with’

Mobile phones are completed by advanced features.

Completed by

OK let’s look at some examples of ‘completed by’:

  • The questionnaires are completed by women aged 15–49.
  • A complete site overhaul was completed by our editorial staff.
  • The detailed project report has been completed by the consultants.

In all three examples we have to be + completed by + agent (the person doing the completing). In our opening example that would make ‘advanced features’ the agent, which is of course impossible. Continue reading

Interested in ‘interest’

Admittedly some people may not interests in the arts.

OK so ‘interest’ is potentially a problematic word.

Let’s say I’m one of those people who like the arts, I like attending arts events, and I like going to galleries, etc. In this case I can say any of the following:

  • I’m interested in the arts.
  • S.o. + (not) to be + interested in + s.th./s.o.
  • The arts interest me.
  • S.th./S.o. + (doesn’t) interest(s) + s.o.
  • I find the arts interesting.
  • S.o. + (doesn’t) find(s) + s.th./s.o. + interesting
  • The arts are interesting to me.
  • S.th./S.o. + (not) to be + interesting + to + s.o.

Returning to our original example, we need:

  • Admittedly some people may not be interested in the arts.
  • Admittedly some people may not find the arts interesting.
  • Admittedly the arts may not interest some people.
  • Admittedly the arts may not be interesting to some people.

Try this practice activity: Continue reading