The widespread misuse of ‘widespread’

The widespread of this crime can be reduced by imposing stricter penalties.

Widespread’ is an adjective, not a noun. Nouns used in this context might include  ‘incidence’, or indeed ‘spread’. These we might classify as ‘statistics nouns’, which are particularly useful in IELTS Task 1 writing.

Widespread’ as complement:

  • This crime is widespread. However, its spread can be reduced by imposing stricter penalties.

Widespread’ as noun modifier:

  • Widespread criminality can be reduced by imposing stricter penalties.

And if you’re interested in ‘spreading‘ and need a laugh, check out ‘manspreading‘!

Paying (for) basic needs

In Australia I will need a lot of money to pay my basic needs.

Indonesian flag This is obviously a translation problem.

  • If I pay the shopkeeper, I give money to the shopkeeper.
  • If I pay for the bananas, I give money to the shopkeeper.
  • If I pay the shopkeeper for the bananas, I give money to the shopkeeper.
  • If I pay the bananas, I give money to the bananas!

Indonesian has different word forms to communicate different meanings – bayar, bayar kepada, bayari, and bayarkan. English, on the other hand, only has ‘pay’ and ‘pay for’:

  1. Pay the man. (Indonesian flag bayar kepada)
  2. Pay for the bananas. (Indonesian flag bayar)
  3. Pay for my coffee, would you? (Indonesian flag bayari)
  4. When you’re in town could you pay my electricity bill for me? Here’s the money. (Indonesian flag bayarkan)

In the first picture (below), a man is paying a woman for some vegetables:

pay for

In the next illustration, a man is paying some fruit and vegetables. He’s giving money to the fruit and vegetables:

pay