When present simple is too simple

Bali’s unique culture and traditions lead to an enormous increase in tourism. As a result, the number of job opportunities grows significantly.

This is grammatically correct, but the choice of present simple tense has – I think – resulted in meanings quite different from those intended by the writer. Continue reading

Time around now

Now I am planning to take my masters degree in public health. I prepare for all requirements especially IELTS. I am studying English so that I can improve my skills and can be accepted by an Australia university.

Occasionally it’s difficult to decide between present simple and present continuous tense, even when using a straightforward time expression like now. There are several possibilities: Continue reading

Description(s)

The first paragraph is mostly argument but it also contains some descriptions.

Yet another word that has slightly different meanings in its countable and uncountable forms. I can’t remember ever seeing it causing grammar problems, but as in the above example, the wrong form may be inappropriate in certain situations. Let’s first of all examine correct usage. Continue reading

The advance of advanced technology

With the advanced of technology, millennials are finding it easier to make friends.

Indonesian flag I’m not sure why Indonesian IELTS candidates write ‘advanced’ (with ‘ed’) in this phrase. It’s possibly their confusing it with advanced technology.

Before you use these words (advance, technology) in the same sentence, decide whether you want to focus on the technology or on the advance! Continue reading

Training or trainings?

This problem can be overcome through government policies that improve access to education and trainings.

Indonesian flag This is one of the rare occasions when low-band Indonesian IELTS candidates add ‘s’ to a word!

Admittedly you will occasionally see training as a countable noun, but the uncountable form is far more common. Think of training (uncountable) as a synonym for education (aslo uncountable). Continue reading

Phonemic Chart

Click phonemes to hear examples!

ɪ
ʊ
e
ə
ɜː
ɔː
æ
ʌ
ɒ
ɪə
ʊə
ɔɪ
əʊ
p
b
t
d
k
g
f
v
θ
ð
s
z
ʃ
ʒ
m
n
ŋ
h
l
r
w
j

To practice identifying phonemes in words, try these minimal pair exercises:

ɪ | i: e | æ e | eɪ s | ʃ