Awareness of ‘towards’

This approach represents their awareness towards the environment.

I think this another example of the clash of the collocation civilisations!

Indonesian flag Indonesians are probably thinking ‘kesadaran terhadap..’, and translating terhadap as towards. I’m afraid that’s not English collocation. Here’s what you need: Continue reading

Lack of ‘lack’

A new song focusing on the word ‘lack’, which can often be mistaken with ‘lack of’. The rule for deciding which to use is in the chorus of the song, so listen carefully and choose the correct item – ‘lack’, or ‘lack of’! (Scroll down for lyrics and gapfill!)

Song performed by an amazing group of AAS scholarship awardees: Andi, Velo, Rapta, Roy, Ade, Novi, Septia, Susan, Vita!

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When present simple is too simple

Bali’s unique culture and traditions lead to an enormous increase in tourism. As a result, the number of job opportunities grows significantly.

This is grammatically correct, but the choice of present simple tense has – I think – resulted in meanings quite different from those intended by the writer. Continue reading

Time around now

Now I am planning to take my masters degree in public health. I prepare for all requirements especially IELTS. I am studying English so that I can improve my skills and can be accepted by an Australia university.

Occasionally it’s difficult to decide between present simple and present continuous tense, even when using a straightforward time expression like now. There are several possibilities: Continue reading

Description(s)

The first paragraph is mostly argument but it also contains some descriptions.

Yet another word that has slightly different meanings in its countable and uncountable forms. I can’t remember ever seeing it causing grammar problems, but as in the above example, the wrong form may be inappropriate in certain situations. Let’s first of all examine correct usage. Continue reading

The advance of advanced technology

With the advanced of technology, millennials are finding it easier to make friends.

Indonesian flag I’m not sure why Indonesian IELTS candidates write ‘advanced’ (with ‘ed’) in this phrase. It’s possibly their confusing it with advanced technology.

Before you use these words (advance, technology) in the same sentence, decide whether you want to focus on the technology or on the advance! Continue reading